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Study Says Women Get Harder Job Interviews Than Men

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Sometimes, navigating your way through a sea of résumés makes actual job interviews look like a light at the end of a tunnel — you've made it, you're going to wow the bosses with your intellect and charm, not just a piece of paper.

Now's the time to shine, except for the fact you're analyzing why women are given more difficult interview questions than men.

Jovo Jovanovic

There's a lot to think about when you finally come face-to-face with those making hiring decisions — like how you'd fit into your new role, how you're supposed to negotiate your salary, what you're going to tell your current employer — so worrying about receiving a more grueling questioning definitely doesn't make the process any more soothing.

According to The Telegraph, a new study shows that women are not only given harder interview questions, but they're also interrupted more frequently than men. We know you're probably scowling at this news, and we can't blame you.

The Telegraph and Marie Claire state that research from University of California and University of Southern California found that women faced up to five questions in which they were interrupted, but male candidates only faced four. Marie Claire further reveals that when men are interrupted, it's "generally more positive and affirming."

Though we've definitely seen improvement, there still need to be greater strides toward equality in the workforce, especially when it comes to salary.

According to a report released last week, White House employees are facing a gap in pay; women receive an average salary of 80 cents for every dollar men make, according to CNN.

Jovo Jovanovic

Even women in Hollywood are experiencing the effects of the gender pay gap — just take a look at Gal Gadot. The new Wonder Woman only received $300,000 for her role — which is continually shattering box office records — while male counterparts such as Henry Cavill earned $14 million for his role of Superman, and Robert Downey Jr. received a whopping $50 million for Iron Man.

It's time — regardless of the field and who is interviewing for positions in said field — to close these gaps.