Does Apple Cider Vinegar Get Rid Of Flies? These Traps Are Bound To Eliminate The Pests

I don't know if it's because of the abundance of fresh fruit in my house or the sheer seasonal heat, but it seems like at the peak of every summer, my apartment is overrun with fruit flies. I've tried just about everything to keep these bad guys away, from putting all of my fruit in the fridge to deep-cleaning all of my countertops. But it looks like one super trendy food might be able to eliminate these pests once and for all. Does apple cider vinegar get rid of flies? TBH, it did the trick for me, and it seems like it's done the same for plenty of other people, so it's definitely worth a try if you're encountering the same problem.

Luckily, there are a few different versions of this DIY method making the rounds on the internet, so if one doesn't quite work to eliminate all those little flies in your apartment, you can easily give another method a try. Plus, I have good news for you: You probably have all of the ingredients at home already to whip up one of these ACV-based concoctions, so you don't have to go out and purchase expensive traps to make sure your home stays clean and bug-free. And even if, for some reason, you've never bought apple cider vinegar before, you'll certainly have plenty of future uses for the incredible stuff, which can help to settle your stomach and even keep your skin glowing.

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Now, one of the most popular apple cider vinegar fly traps comes from Apartment Therapy, and it requires just a couple of things you likely have lying around the house. You'll need good ol' ACV, plastic wrap, dish soap, and a small mug or mason jar. Once you've gathered your ingredients, cover the bottom of the jar with a small layer of apple cider vinegar and a drop of dish soap. Then, cover the mouth of the jar with plastic wrap, poking a few small holes so that the flies can enter. According to Apartment Therapy, adding the soap to the surface of the ACV ensures that the nasty creatures can't just perch on top of the vinegar.

If you notice that your fruit flies are unusually smart and aren't venturing into the abyss under the plastic wrap, go for a more direct approach and forgo the plastic wrap altogether. If you want to try out this method, Good Housekeeping recommends adding three drops of dish soap to the surface, which the publication says "cuts the surface tension of the vinegar so the flies will sink and drown." Honestly, that's a little terrifying to think about, but at the rate that these creatures multiply, a girl's gotta do what a girl's gotta do, you know?

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But if you've somehow managed to have the worst luck in the world, and your kitchen is attracting only the smartest, most cunning fruit flies that don't fall for a single one of your traps, it may be time for an even more obvious lure to get the insects to take your bait. The natural living blog Nature Moms suggests adding a piece of super ripe fruit to the bottom of your ACV trap, which should be so tempting to those hungry creatures that they won't be able to resist approaching. You can also add a paper cone to the trap, the blog says; that way, the flies won't be able to escape once they've entered the jar. Plus, if you're a little squeamish about killing bugs, this might be a good option for you, as the blog suggests you might be able to take the trapped bugs outside to release them after they've swarmed your fruit lure.

In an entirely not-scientifically-proven piece of personal advice, I recommend emptying out and refreshing your fruit fly traps twice a day. Again, I have no legit evidence to support this, other than good old trial and error in my own kitchen, but it seems like the little pests tend to lose interest if the trap is left to sit for too long. It looks like the promise of a fresh drink keeps them interested (#relatable).