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Is It Safe To Photograph The Solar Eclipse? Here's What You Need To Know


There's no denying that you've been completely caught up in the solar eclipse craze like everyone else. Whether it's your mood or your four-legged friend's behavior, the event is believed to affect seemingly everything, so brace yourself. Since something like this hasn't happened in so long, people are dying to get a glimpse (with their special glasses, of course). As this the first smartphone-era solar eclipse, it begs the question: Is it safe to photograph the solar eclipse?

People are more than ready to rake in the likes on Instagram with out-of-this-world shots , but can a phone handle that type of light? Will it be able accurately capture the power of the event, without causing damage in the process?

"We've got the ultimate bright, with very dangerous ultraviolet and infrared rays coming through, and we can almost bet money that folks are going to zoom in as close as they can to the sun,”  Ken Sklute, an eclipse photography expert from Canon, told The TODAY Show. “First off, that can't be good for the product, but my real concern is for the user.”

NASA released a lengthy 12-page booklet on how to prepare yourself for the highly anticipated  event if your hellbent on shooting it with your iPhone.  (No judgment — everyone appreciates a good photo on social.)


Experts recommend that you use a solar filter on your camera while wearing the appropriate glasses, especially during the time before and after totality, according to the TODAY Show. Sklute, however, appears to think a point and shoot camera (rather than a smartphone) is a more suitable fit to capture the phenomenon.

And, on a final note, he told The TODAY Show,

Take a look at NASA'S guides, NEVER remove your special glasses, and enjoy! There are plenty of funny memes to relive the anticipation of this event, too, if you're in need of a good chuckle.