What Is The Yogi Jacket? The Acupressure Jacket Soothes Stress & Back Pain At The Same Time

If you spend a lot of time in front of a computer, then you've probably experienced some annoying muscle tension at one point or another. As a writer myself, by the end of the week, my tight shoulders are hunched up to my ears like a sleeping bat, and all I want is a massage from a professional arm wrestler to relieve the pain. But I'm sure you know exactly how hard it can be to find that kind of time to take care of your body's kinks and knots, which is what makes the Yogi Jacket Kickstarter campaign so awesome.

At first glance, the Yogi Jacket looks like your typical piece of athleisure. It's a form-fitting zip-up jacket — one that looks like you'd wear it to the gym, or maybe yoga class, on a windy fall day — but according to its Kickstarter page, the inside of the jacket is made of over 7,000 little spikes, and "provides the feel and benefits of a professional acupressure treatment for a fraction of the price." Moreover, the campaign's page claims the jacket "relieves back pain, promotes relaxation of tense muscles throughout the day and is known for increasing blood circulation."

In other words, it's a jacket that essentially relieves both stress and muscle tension by low-key massaging your body while you're on the move — sounds almost too good to be true, right?

But if you're sitting there wondering what the heck "acupressure" even is, don't worry — I got you. According to massage therapist and counselor Kathy Morelli, LMT, LPC, the practice is derived from traditional Chinese Medicine. "It's a form of bodywork whereby pressure is applied on acupressure points (or acu-points) using fingers, elbows, or hands," she tells Elite Daily in an email. "Both acupuncture and acupressure use the same pressure points, but acupuncture employs needles, while acupressure uses finger pressure."

When these pressure points are stimulated, Morelli explains, it helps to restore your energetic balance, relieve symptoms of pain and muscle tension, and it can increase circulation and promote relaxation.

Circling back to the Yogi Jacket, that basically means the jacket's inside lining of acupressure spikes simulates the work of human hands — which is honestly so cool, right?

And how was such a brilliant product created, you may ask? Well, according to a press release about the Yogi Jacket, which was sent directly to Elite Daily via email, a man named Tanveer Grewal came up with the idea back in 2015 when he was suffering from back pain and low energy. He tried traditional acupressure therapy first, and he found that it was not only effective for relieving his back pain, but also in helping him feel calmer and more centered overall.

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As per the press release, Grewal wanted to see if he could create a product that delivers the same healing powers of acupressure, without actually having to go to a professional or schedule an appointment. After all, as Grewal explained on the Yogi Jacket's Kickstarter page, "acupressure therapy can get really expensive from a licensed acupuncturist, the spike mats are too bulky to carry everywhere and you have to dedicate a separate time and space to get the desired benefits."

The Yogi Jacket eliminates all of these potential inconveniences and makes it easy for you to enjoy the benefits of acupressure wherever, whenever. According to the press release, Grewal designed the jacket in his own basement, using spikes he'd pulled off of an acupressure mat for his first prototype. After that, he "started incorporating it into [his] daily routine at home, work and anywhere he went consistently." Soon enough, the press release explained, he began to experience "increased energy levels, more alertness, reduction in stress and back pain, improved quality of sleep along with various other benefits." And thus, the Yogi Jacket was officially born.

Yogi Jacket

So, if the product has piqued your interest, hop on over to the Yogi Jacket Kickstarter page to learn more, and consider pledging some cash for the campaign, if you're so inclined. Grewal's target goal is $20,000, and you have the option of pledging a minimum of $5 to simply support the campaign, or you can splurge for $89 to get the jacket and try it out yourself.