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If You Chose An iPhone Over An Android, Science Says You're Probably Obnoxious

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So, I have an iPhone — because I'm a civilized human being and I like feeling and looking like I'm in the future — but apparently, people who buy Androids are, on average, allegedly more honest and humble than their iPhone-owning counterparts.

A study conducted by Heather Shaw from the University of Lincoln's School of Psychology took a look at hundreds of smartphone users to see if they shared any traits.

Not only did they find that the Android users surveyed were generally more honest and humble, but that iPhone users were also more extroverted and more likely to be concerned with status.

Now it isn't all that surprising that iPhone users would be more concerned with status than Android users. After all, iPhone's are 1) more expensive and 2) were, for a long time, generally considered the middle-class norm in the smartphone market, so to decide to choose an Android meant that you had to be at least moderately less concerned with this weird technological signifier of middle-class status.

Of course, Android phones are also expensive, so the differences here are slight, but, intuitively, the status distinction noticed in this study makes sense, at least to me.

As Shaw explains,

It is becoming more and more apparent that smartphones are becoming a mini digital version of the user, and many of us don't like it when other people use our phones because it can reveal so much about us.

Shaw and her researchers hope, as our technology integrates itself even deeper into our lives (is that even possible), to further study the ways in which the choices we make on our phones reflect what we want and who we want to be.

By the way, the new iPhone comes out next week.