Simon Desrochers

How To See The Corona During The Solar Eclipse

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Among all of the hype surrounding this spectacular celestial event happening today, the 2017 solar eclipse is finally upon us. It's now time to break out your certified eclipse glasses (along with your popcorn and v. necessary wine), and gaze up at the sky in complete and utter amazement. If you've been planning out your viewing of the solar eclipse down to every single detail -- from the type of cocktails you're mixing up for your sun and moon-themed afterparty, to the ultimate location to sky gaze with your friends -- you're probably also wondering how to see the solar eclipse corona.

The corona is the sun's upper atmosphere, and undeniably the coolest sight of the 2017 solar eclipse. It's truly a life-changing experience you do not want to miss out on. During the eclipse's totality, when the moon completely covers the sun, the edges from the sun's corona create a spooky-looking (but super freaking cool) effect of light surrounding the moon. According to Exploratorium, the short period of the total solar eclipse is the only time us earthlings will actually be able to view the breathtaking light of the corona. Be sure to have your cameras readily available to snap away.

Totality is also the only time during the solar eclipse when you can safely view the happenings in the sky without your eclipse glasses on. The temperature will drop, and bright stars will make an appearance in the magical canvas that is the sky. Keep in mind, this is all happening during the day. How epic is that?

Getty Images/Babak Tafreshi

Looking directly at the sky during a solar eclipse can result in major eye damage. Be sure to have a legit pair of eclipse glasses that are specifically approved by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and the American Astronomical Society, to ensure the protection of your eyes. Once you're all set with your glasses on, you're in for a breathtaking celestial affair.