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Emily Ratajkowski Perfectly Sums Up Why Nobody Calls Men 'Attention Whores'

Model Emily Ratajkowski has a lot to say about the sexist double standard  women face when it comes to wanting attention.

Luckily, she's not about keeping her thoughts to herself. The 25-year-old talks about the double standard women face when it comes to attention and judgment in Glamour.

She spoke to why women have to explain themselves when they want to be sexy, serious, dressed up, political or, well, just about anything. And on the other hand, men don't have to be ready to defend anything they do, no matter how attention-seeking it is.

Here's the thing. As humans, we all have an innate desire for an attention. It's literally hardwired into our biology.

But women aren't dealt the same hand of cards as men when it comes to being judged for our actions.

Wanting attention is genderless. It's human.

Judgment on our looks and actions are so normal, women have just accepted it. Ratajkowski explains,

I realized then that I've been called an attention whore so often that I had almost gotten used to it. And as women we are accused of seeking attention more than men are, whether for speaking out politically, as I did, for dressing a certain way, or for even posting a selfie. Our culture has a double standard that runs so deep, many women have actually built up an automatic defense — attempting to be a step ahead of potential critics by making sure we have 'real' reasons for anything we say or do.

Women shouldn't need a reason ready to go in case accusations fly our way. She's totally right.

This double standard holds women back from being everything they want to be, whether that's sexy, serious, confident, athletic, feminine, masculine... the list goes on.

The "Gone Girl" actress puts it perfectly:

It's absurd to think that desire for attention doesn't drive both women and men. Why are women scrutinized for it more, then? And if a woman dresses up because she does want attention, male or otherwise, does that make her guilty of something? Or less 'serious'? Our society doesn't question men's motivations for taking their shirt off, or shaving, or talking about politics — nor should it. Wanting attention is genderless. It's human.

She also commented on the recent tragedy of the woman jogging alone in Queens, NY who was raped and murdered. Apparently, people made victim-blaming comments about her looks.

Ratajkowski makes an excellent point,

This is how far the attention accusation can go: It validates the idea that this woman's actions — wearing makeup, posting selfies — might have contributed to her senseless murder. Would you have seen the same type of comment had the victim been male? Doubtful.

It's sad, but true.

Her concluding thoughts were especially powerful.

We shouldn't be weighed down with the responsibility of explaining our every move. We shouldn't have to apologize for wanting attention either. We don't owe anyone an explanation. It's not our responsibility to change the way we are seen — it's society's responsibility to change the way it sees us.

Preach, girl. I hope her words reach as many people as possible because it's time for this double standard to disappear.

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Citations: Emily Ratajkowski Is Out to Prove That Women Can Be "Serious and Sexual" (Emily Ratajkowski)