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The First 3D-Printed Clitoris Proves How Little We Know About it

If Paris is the city of love, then it must now also be the city of orgasms, as French researchers have created the first 3D-printed model of a clitoris.

It seems that at last, the female orgasm can be demythologized once and for all, and everyone is hailing this model as the start of a sexual revolution.

For years, and even today, sex education classes have neglected to give students in-depth knowledge about the clitoris, with many textbooks dismissing the female sex organ as "a small projection about two centimeters long and one-half centimeter in diameter."

And this model proves that simple definition is far from accurate.

This lack of knowledge about the source of female sexual pleasure also has some considerable implications.

If students aren't taught about the clitoris, but are taught about its male counterpart, then it's safe to assume people will be far more knowledgable about male sexual pleasure.

Most of them will be left in the dark about what a female orgasm actually entails and what it takes for women to achieve one.

New York artist Sophia Wallace, whose project Cliteracy seeks to dismantle the taboo surrounding female genitals, argues that ignorance of the clitoris pervades modern society:

It is a curious dilemma to observe the paradox that on the one hand the female body is the primary metaphor for sexuality, its use saturates advertising, art and the mainstream erotic imaginary. Yet, the clitoris, the true female sexual organ, is virtually invisible.

So basically, people are more than happy to see sexualized images of the female body pasted in every magazine and every store window, but when it comes to female sexual gratification itself, they are disinterested and almost repulsed.

But hopefully that has all changed now that people can see what the clitoris actually looks like and realize how big of a part it is in the female anatomy.

Citations: This is a 3D model of a clitoris – and the start of a sexual revolution (The Guardian)