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Video Of White Student Juggling For Police Raises Eyebrows

By now you might have seen this widely circulated video of a college kid juggling during a traffic stop.

That kid is Blayk Puckett, a 21-year-old student at the University of Arkansas who got pulled over last Friday when cops suspected him of drunk driving.

What started off as a sobriety check ended up with a magic trick display.

Yes, Puckett ended up juggling pins while the cops recorded him.

Now before we get to how people are raising a few skeptical eyebrows at this, I'd be remiss if I didn't add a few details.

First, Puckett also had a broken tail light out, which further explains why he got stopped. Secondly, at the time that he started juggling, the cops had already checked his license and took him out the car to explain to him that the tail light hadn't been working.

Third, this is a stop done by campus police, who we all know are police, but not really police. In other words, we expect those types of cops to be softer.

Either way, the kid didn't really "juggle" his way out of trouble, exactly (even though it sounds good to say that).

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Still, though, it's just shocking to see how all of this went down.

I mean, he reached into his pocket with no hostility shown with him. Went to grab random objects in his back seat with no hesitation. He was also casually scrolling through his phone when the police came.

They didn't even give my man a breathalyzer.

I'm not even hating, either. The video definitely gave me a few laughs (perhaps not for the same reasons as everyone else, but laughs nonetheless).

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People pointed out the privilege in the situation.

However, there definitely were some people who were mad, and who had their anger validated by the tens of thousands of people retweeting them.

It was inevitable what point these skeptics would bring up, too, and that point goes along the lines of this: Um, where is this type of kindness when seemingly innocent people get shot in cold blood?

Yes, people can't help but point to people like Philando Castile, for a rather simple reason.

Let's just say, the type of benefit of the doubt shown to that juggler is a total novelty to certain groups of people.

Oh, and if you're wondering why "everything have to be about race," that's a good question.

The people who are rubbed the wrong way by this video probably wonder the same thing whenever they get stopped.

Citations: WCVB-TV