Woman Who Was Told She'd Never Walk Defies Odds And Becomes Model

Four years after partial paralysis, Katie Knowles isn't just walking. She's modeling like she's the next Kate Moss.

Knowles, 24, has become a model in spite of her struggle with spinal stenosis, most commonly seen in elderly people, and degenerative disc disease.

The diagnosis, which she received at the young age of 15, would shape her life.

Although she always enjoyed sports and dance, Knowles felt her passion slipping away with the feeling in her limbs.

And at 20, the Newcastle, England resident woke up unable to move after a disc removal surgery that should've helped her feel better.

She told the Daily Mail, "[The procedure] took nine hours and was supposed to be the cure I needed."

"I woke up in agony and completely unable to walk."

Knowles was unable to accept the feeling her life was “over,” and endured months of physical therapy in order to learn how to walk once more.

Because she was so unsteady on her feet, a friend suggested posing for photographs as a way to gain her confidence back.

It was the beginning of a new life for Knowles, who'd once been called “Bambi” because of her shakiness during therapy.

Photographers offered positions in bridal shoots and independent clothing brand campaigns.

The shoots allowed Knowles to express herself in front of the camera the way she initially couldn't in real life.

Knowles remembered, "I had nothing to lose so I thought I may as well give it a go."

"As soon as I got in front of the camera I loved it."

"...the response was amazing."

And though Knowles still relies on crutches for help getting around, she grows stronger every day.

What's more, she pushes herself to achieve poses and artistic visions set forth during modeling shoots.

Knowles since joined the campaign Models of Diversity, which works to spread help people of every skin color, sexual orientation and physical ability model.

She's spreading the word you don't have to be perfect in order to fulfill your ambitions.

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Paralysis isn't the end.

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