9 International Wedding Traditions To Make Yours Stand Out

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Weddings are magical days to celebrate love, eat loads of food and get drunk.

(They're also great days to get drunk and celebrate your singlehood when you're the only single guest at the wedding.)

All around the world, weddings are hosted with different foods, receptions and traditions.

If you want to make your wedding unforgettable, you can incorporate some fun traditions from around the world into your own ceremony and reception.

Here are seven wedding traditions that could spice up your own ceremony:

1. Incorporate a croquembouche.

Instead of serving a wedding cake at the reception, couples in France serve croquembouche.

It's basically a mountain of pastries, and who doesn't love that idea?

It's a great, unique replacement for the traditional wedding cake that will have your guests wishing they were in Paris.

 3. Use a unity bowl.

Australian couples use unity bowls as a romantic way of celebrating the day.

Guests are given different types of stones when they arrive, and they hold them during the ceremony as they watch the couple wed. After the ceremony ends, the guests place their stones in a large bowl to give to the bride and groom.

The unity bowl symbolizes the support and love the newlyweds have from their family members and friends.

4. Guests aren't always personally invited.

Those who plan on getting married in Thailand can incorporate a tradition that's been practiced in the country for hundreds of years.

Thai weddings are often very large, ranging from 100 to 300 guests. And that's probably because the wedding reception includes an evening feast where guests are welcome to bring along their family members and friends who may not have been invited.

5. The celebration can last for days.

Couples looking to have a destination wedding should consider getting married in India. There, weddings last for several days.

Before the wedding begins, a ceremony is held at the bride's family's home, where her arms, legs and other body parts are decorated with henna.

The weddings consist of several different rituals and ceremonies, which include the bride and groom exchanging rings as they wed. Flower garlands are also put around each other's necks during the ceremony.

6. Stomp on glass.

Jewish grooms stomp on glass wrapped in a piece of cloth during the ceremony, which represents how the Holy Temple was destroyed in Jerusalem.

The glass-breaking also symbolizes the combination of joy and sadness that occurs in life.

Finally, the couple marry each other under a chuppah, believed to offer protection from evil spirits.

7. Eat chocolate.

Couples in France prepare for their wedding night by eating chocolate and leftover food out of a toilet bowl once the reception is over.

The treats are consumed to give each person extra strength for their intimate time together following the reception.

And of course, champagne accompanies the food to celebrate the marriage and ease their nerves after saying "I do."

8. It's a community affair.

In Jamaica, entire villages are invited to attend weddings.

Also, the groom wears a bush jacket, while the bride wears a traditional, white gown. And although most weddings around the world feature only a single wedding cake, Jamaican weddings feature several different cakes.

And in what sounds like a beautiful tradition, the wedding often takes place in a booth during the ceremony, which is constructed out of flowers and coconut boughs.

9. Begin planning at birth.

German families begin planning their daughters' wedding days at birth to alleviate the financial burden of the event.

The parents plant three different trees and allow them to grow until the woman is engaged. Then, the trees are sold.

A wedding newspaper is also created by the friends and family of the couple. It consists of various stories and pictures of the bride and groom, and the profits of the newspaper are used to pay for the honeymoon.