This Beyoncé Fan Got To Try Out That Symbolic White Face Paint From 'Sorry'


I have this pet theory that Beyoncé stopped being human long ago. Just hear me out.

Two decades into her career, Queen B rarely appears in public, almost never speaks and seems to bring together artists with an influence none of us will ever understand. Like a musically gifted Bill Murray, she's the patron saint of creatives who never got much attention.

Take, for example, a fan of hers who had the chance to meet Laolu Senbanjo, the Nigerian body painter who created all those incredible white paint designs for the song "Sorry."

Remember this?

Redditor TheQueen_B shared her experience online, explaining he worked a little of his magic on her face.

Yes, those same hands that have touched the undoubtedly perfect skin of Her Hive-ness. Beyoncé's blessed her by association.


The experience got TheQueen_B thinking about all the ways we put makeup into a box, assuming it's only for nights out and glamour shots. In reality, Senbanjo's designs exist somewhere between body paint and beauty work.

She explained,

Indeed, Senbanjo once told Essence he doesn't think of himself as a makeup artist. The white body paint, which he calls "Sacred Art Of The Ori," is meant to be an artistic representation of subjects' souls on their skin.

What's more, the art style pays homage to Senbanjo's African heritage.


After receiving a few questions about the designs on her face, TheQueen_B elaborated on her time as a human canvas.

She said,

Question: If you cry every single time you listen to Lemonade, is that the opposite of warrior strength?

I'm asking for a friend, obviously.

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