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Listen App Lets You Have 2 Phone Numbers

There's a certain art form when it comes to texting.

There's the way you reply (with or without punctuation and emojis), the length of your reply (keeping it short because you're pissed, huh?) and of course, the amount of time it takes you to reply.

Proper messaging etiquette is even more complicated when you throw dating into the mix, am I right?

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Lauren Leto, founder of the popular website TextsFromLastNight.com, is certainly no stranger to this method of communication.

Since the launch of her site in 2009, Leto has had plenty of time to think about perfecting messaging platforms. On November 17, she added another digital accomplishment to her resume with her new app, Listen.

While speaking to Business Insider, she said,

When my friend text messages me, I have to text message her back — I can't let these things fall by the wayside. But at the same time, all the expectation is on you and it's all going through your most direct access line.

Listen is kind of like the Twitter of phone apps. It will give its users the option to not be driven so crazy by constant contact, and also give them the option to keep certain contacts on the hush-hush if need be.

Get where I'm going with this?

According to Business Insider, users will have the option to have a new number they can give out to anyone. But it acts like a vetting system for those contacting you.

Listeners (see what I did there?) will be able to mute text messages without blocking the sender, set text message reminders, swipe right and store any information within the conversation to the contact's profile.

Are we sensing any similarities here?

While it seems like the perfect opportunity to not get overwhelmed by messages and calls, it's also a good way to be a bit scandalous... if you so choose.

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App users can give their new Listen number to people they're interested in, while their SOs will have their actual phone number.

Leto also said in the Business Insider article,

Blocking someone on the phone, there's a social contract there. You can't just block that friend that's annoying, but texting is a lot and we're all busy. My friend will be like, 'What do you think for the bachelorette party?' and I'm like, 'It's in August!'

So, what do you think?

Will Listen be for those who need organization in their digital lives? Or will Listen be a good way to hide those sketchy booty calls users want to keep on the DL?

Citations: Business Insider