Can Apple Cider Vinegar Treat Yeast Infections? Here's Why You Need To Try It


If there's such a thing as a miracle remedy, then apple cider vinegar is as close an earthly recipe as we've gotten so far. Apple cider vinegar has so many health benefits that it becomes hard to decide whether you should drink it, rub it against your teeth, or slather it all over your face. It clears up skin, curbs your sugar cravings, lowers your blood sugar levels, whitens teeth, kickstarts your immune system, and whatever you don't inject into your body can be used as a powerful home-cleaning product, as well. Throw a rock and you'll probably hit a new, previously unknown benefit that ACV can yield for your body, but can apple cider vinegar treat yeast infections?

The short answer is yes, because apple cider vinegar is a holy liquid bestowed upon us from the heavens that can basically cure your entire body from the inside out.

Vaginal yeast infections are the most common form of vaginal inflammation, and they usually involve a whole lot of squirming and itchiness. Other forms of general unpleasantness include a wonderful array of symptoms, such as periodic discharge, redness and inflammation, fishy odors, and an overall pelvic soreness that makes you want to lie down and never get up again.

Apparently, apple cider vinegar is the masked vigilante that can take down your yeast infection without any sort of over-the-counter prescription.

It makes sense, if you think about it. The reason why apple cider vinegar is so effective for yeast infections is founded in the same reasons why it helps boost your immune system: It regulates pH and works as a disinfectant against bacteria.

Since a yeast infection means the pH of your vagina is off and bacteria has accumulated as a result, it essentially creates the perfect opportunity to bring a little ACV into the picture.

Now, according to Home Remedies For Life, there are many ways to use apple cider vinegar to cure a yeast infection.

The easiest way to get the job done is to use a douching kit.

Yes, douching can sometimes be a bad strategy. But if you do it under the right circumstances, it can often provide much-needed relief from discomfort in a quick and painless way.

The most important thing to remember with this is that you absolutely have to dilute the ACV substantially, otherwise the acidity of the liquid may cause burning sensations, and then you'll be stuck with a yeast infection that now has an added layer of molten fire to the aforementioned general unpleasantness.

Another option is to take an apple cider vinegar bath. For this, fill your bathtub with warm water and add two cups of apple cider vinegar, along with one cup of iodized sea salt. Sit in the bath mixture for at least 15 minutes; add the requisite amount of rubber ducky playtime. Also, relax, because you're taking a bath, after all.

After you're finished, just drain the tub like you normally would. The bonus is that you've also sort of cleaned your tub while cleaning your body! #Winning.

The last option is a little, well, unorthodox: You can soak a tampon in apple cider vinegar.

The argument for this is that it will press against your vaginal walls and therefore start soothing the affected area immediately. But again, it's crucial that you dilute the ACV before dunking a tampon into it. With great power comes great responsibility, and the sheer power of ACV should not be trifled with.

The healing qualities of apple cider vinegar have been proven time and time again. Even if you don't have a yeast infection, incorporating ACV into your life is a great way to take your self-care routine to the next level.

As always, you should see a doctor if any of those lovely symptoms seem to be getting worse, or if — gasp! — the apple cider vinegar doesn't seem to be doing the trick. After all, even heroes fall.