5 Foods That Boost Your Energy For The Cold Months Ahead, According To Experts

I don't know if you can relate, but there's something about the weather getting cooler that makes me want to turn myself into a blanket burrito and just snuggle into my couch all day long. The colder it gets outside, the more determined I am to keep all movements to a minimum, which obviously isn't very healthy — but it doesn't have to be this way. If October is keeping you from feeling your most chipper, add some foods that boost your energy into your diet, and you'll be knocking items off of your to-do list in no time.

If you're a devoted tea or coffee lover, brewing a hot mug of your favorite caffeinated beverage should help do the trick. But for sustained energy without a caffeine crash, try to incorporate some of the below foods into each meal. Whether you opt for a bowl full of sweet oatmeal or a plate of raw oysters, nourishing your body with the right nutrients is sure to help you kick the fall doldrums.

Another helpful tip? Try to research foods that are in season: "It is important that we try to incorporate seasonal foods in our diet," Dr. Mike Roussell, Ph.D., co-founder of Neuro Coffee and Neutein, tells Elite Daily in an email, "as foods that are available seasonally are going to be fresher and potentially more nutrient-rich."

Here are five foods that'll help you rediscover your energy as the cold weather begins to set in.

Go to town on goji berries

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If you aren't familiar with the magical properties of the humble goji berry, a super tart dried fruit that tastes a little like a sour cherry (at least to me), then you're in for a real treat. According to a study published in The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, drinking goji berry juice for as little as two weeks might significantly boost your energy levels, as well as your ability to focus, and it might even help you feel more calm, too.

Pro tip: If you're not quite sold on the idea of eating these bad boys straight out of the bag, try sprinkling some on top of your smoothie bowl, or even stirring a handful into your morning oatmeal.

Fill up on plenty of oatmeal

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Speaking of oatmeal, the whole-grain dish is perfect for fighting even the harshest cold-weather energy slump. According to a review of the nutritional profile of oats, published in the Journal of Food Science Technology, the food's high lipid content means that it packs a hearty energy punch for your body.

Of course, another bonus of this creamy dish is that it's the perfect warm treat to lure you out of bed on a chilly morning.

Warm up with a bowl of bone broth

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"We often recommend protein-rich, liquid foods, like broth, specifically bone broth, as it can help bolster your immune system," Monica Auslander Moreno, MS, RD, LD/N, nutrition consultant for RSP Nutrition, tells Elite Daily in an email.

Don't be afraid to jazz up your soup with plenty of extra flavors. "You'll also want to include spices like oregano, turmeric, garlic, and cayenne in your broth, which may fight [colds] as well," Moreno explains.

Eat plenty of raw oysters

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I'll admit, this one's kind of unexpected but apparently, oysters can do a lot to keep you feeling energized as the weather changes. "Raw oysters are best during the cold months," says Dr. Roussell. "They also are very rich in zinc. Zinc is a key mineral that is needed for proper immune and brain function — two important things during the cold months when you feel like you might be dragging."

Fulfill all of your pasta dreams

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Dr. Roussell says you definitely shouldn't neglect your favorite carb-heavy meals as the weather changes, because carbs not only give you lots of great energy, they can also help to prevent weather-related mood slumps as well, he explains. Basically, according to Roussell, the insulin released in your body when you eat carbs gets converted into serotonin. "The more serotonin your brain produces, the better you will feel," he explains.

Moral of the story: Never say no to a bowl full of spaghetti if you're looking for some extra energy.