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People Who Love 'Friends' Have Higher SAT Scores, According To New Study

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You'd think that people who watch “serious dramas” would be the smartest demographic when it comes to TV watchers.

Forfeiting that – and yeah, I'm the kind of person who uses the word "forfeiting" with ease and grace – you'd think it would be the people who are all about those "serious documentaries."

But you'd be wrong on both counts.

According to a survey done by DIRECTV that compared people's SAT scores to the shows they most like to watch, those who scored the highest were also the most likely to be into – wait for it – comedies.

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Yes, apparently, smart people like jokes. In a way, that kind of makes sense: Jokes are sort of all about wordplay and solved language riddles. (Yes, I'm overthinking this.)

Now, yes, the SATs test a very specific type of intelligence. They also determine how much money a family was willing to pay tutors or programs. But still, setting that aside, the results are still pretty fascinating.

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Seventy-five percent of comedy lovers achieve above average scores, as compared to 36 percent of drama enthusiasts.

And by a significant margin. Take a look:

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The study went into more detail as well, and even looked at specific shows.

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The fact that "Arrested Development" resides in the bottom column is a disgrace. But if I consider the general trend, I am pleased.

It's pretty weird to see that serious, experimental, slow shows like "True Detective" and "Band of Brothers" attract those who scored lower than the average.

The study even compared the critical reading and math scores associated with the specific shows that people "liked" on Facebook. As the graphic below explains, the average math and critical reading scores are 525 and 534.

Take a look at the findings:

DIRECTV

Specifically, they found that people who liked shows like “Seinfeld” and “Friends” performed better on their SATs.

This is all well and good, but the biggest lesson here is this: Watch whatever you want. Someone might create a study about how it makes you smart one day.