Weather Channel Says Fall 2017 Will Be Hotter Than Usual, So Get Your PSL Iced

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Ah, swapping wardrobes — the necessary evil when you live in a micro-sized apartment and can't accommodate summer and winter clothes in one closet. I suggest you don't start packing away your dresses and rompers just yet, because you might be wearing them well into the cooler months. As it turns out, the Weather Channel claims fall 2017 will be hotter than usual, so cardigans and Pumpkin Spice Lattes will not be required (unless it's an iced PSL, of course).

Marti Sans

Flannel shirts, apple ciders, and pumpkins are all staples of the season, but this year, so is the heat. From September to November — prime boot-wearing months — areas throughout the East Coast, South, and Midwest will experience warmer temperatures, according to the Weather Channel, which says unusual weather patterns are the reason for the temperature surge. Though southern states like Florida and Georgia will experience relatively high September temps, they will also experience the heat wave when October comes.

The Weather Channel's Twitter account, @WeatherChannel, gave everyone a glimpse of what they can expect. Typically, the U.S. map features cooler colors in the winter months to signify the cooler temperatures. This year, however, those colors are looking awfully warm, minus the Northwest region, which isn't expected to get hit with the heat.

Since many people are not ready to do away with sweater weather, they've taken to Twitter to create a sob story.

I can't say I blame them. I, too, am one to enjoy some apple picking in my fall blazers. Looks like I'm going to have to opt for a tank top instead.

Perhaps the most frightening tweet of them all is this:

There's no denying that climate change is happening, and it's affecting not only the weather, but our land and how it can handle things like natural disasters. While it might not be as fun to sip a PSL in the heat, there are certainly more serious consequences that result from these sporadic weather patterns.