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These Tweets About Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s Death Mourn & Honor Her Legacy

On the evening of Friday, Sept. 18, citizens across the United States learned that Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg had died of complications from metastatic cancer of the pancreas. The feminist icon inspired countless people with her decades in law, so it's no surprise Twitter lit up with several emotional tributes. From celebrities to politicians, these tweets about Ruth Bader Ginsburg's death emphasize just how inspirational the late Supreme Court Justice was throughout her life.

The Supreme Court announced Ginsburg had died in her Washington, D.C. home on Sept. 18. She was 87 years old. The trailblazing legal professional established herself as a cultural and political icon over the past half a century. Ginsburg devoted the bulk of her legal career to implementing laws for gender equality and women's rights, becoming an icon in feminism. Throughout the '80s, Ginsburg served as a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals, before President Bill Clinton nominated her for Supreme Court Justice in 1993. Ginsburg served on the Supreme Court up until her death.

Due to her tireless work in championing and implementing rulings that advanced the rights of women, Ginsburg left an enormous impact on all Americans. After news of her death broke, several notable cultural and political figures voiced how much Ginsburg's legacy meant to them.

Ginsburg's death came at a particularly alarming time: just a couple months before the 2020 presidential election. Her death leaves a vacancy on the Supreme Court, and many progressives fear President Donald Trump will nominate a replacement Justice in the midst of his reelection campaign against Joe Biden.

The situation closely mirrors Justice Antonin Scalia's death in 2016. After Scalia died, President Barack Obama nominated Merrick Garland as his replacement on the Supreme Court, but Senate Republicans refused to vote on the nomination on the grounds that because it was an election year, the nomination should take place after the election. The unprecedented move ended up allowing Trump to nominate and install Neil Gorsuch as Scalia's replacement on the Supreme Court. Now, both Biden and Obama are arguing Senate Republicans should follow the same rule they established in 2016 to carry out the 2020 presidential election before nominated Ginsburg's replacement.

While there are still a lot of complicated political matters to deal with in the wake of Ginsburg's death, for most people who looked up to the feminist icon, now is both a time to mourn and also continue to fight in her memory.