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Here’s What You Can Do To Support People In Ukraine Right Now

Millions of people have reportedly fled the country, and at least a million more are displaced.

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For months, Russian President Vladimir Putin indicated he intended to invade Ukraine, and on Feb. 23, it happened. As of early April, an estimated four million Ukrainians have reportedly fled the country, while Russia has been accused of war crimes for its actions in Ukraine. As the world watches this crisis unfold, people all over the globe are wondering how they can help. So, here’s how to help Ukrainian civilians and refugees amid Russia’s invasion.

As of early April, civilian deaths are mounting: more than 1,000 Ukrainian civilians have been reported killed per United Nations data, and the true number is likely much higher. Millions of Ukrainians have fled the country, per the BBC, and around six million more are internally displaced by the fighting. Photos and videos across social media showed people taking refuge in makeshift bomb shelters, as well as fleeing on foot, by mass transport, or by car.

“Russia has turned the Ukrainian sky into a source of death for thousands of people,” Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy said in a March 16 address to U.S. Congress. “Russian troops have already fired nearly a thousand missiles at Ukraine. Countless bombs. They use drones to kill us with precision,” he added.

While Russian leaders have stated they would scale back military operations amid negotiations, Ukraine and its allies don’t buy it. “Russia has repeatedly lied about its intentions so we can only judge Russia on its actions not on its words,” NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg said in a March 31 statement, per Sky News. “According to our intelligence, Russian troops are not withdrawing but repositioning.”

Ukraine was under control of the Soviet Union before gaining independence when the Soviet Union collapsed in 1991. For the 30 years since, Ukraine has been an independent nation — and is now threatened by Russia’s invasion. While it’s easy to lose hope in a crisis like this, there are a few things you can do to help Ukrainian people during these difficult circumstances.

World Food Program

Dedicated to alleviating global hunger, World Food Program is “on the ground providing urgently needed food assistance to people fleeing the violence” in Ukraine. Since Russia’s invasion began, millions of families have fled their homes as refugees. With just one $75 donation, the World Food Program can provide a single one of these families with a month’s worth of important nutritional staples, such as beans, grains, cereals, and more. To help them provide food to as many refugee families as possible, visit their donation page here.

CARE

Founded in 1945, CARE works all over the world to “save lives, defeat poverty, and achieve social justice.” As the number of Ukrainian refugees mounts amid Russia’s invasion, CARE is dedicated to distributing much-needed supplies, such as food, water, hygiene kits, and cash to support everyday needs. To support their mission, you can donate here.

Heart to Heart International

Heart to Heart International is a medical organization dedicated to improving health care access around the world. As Russia continues its invasion of Ukraine, this organization is providing critical medical supplies to those in need. To support their work, you can donate here.

Fight for Right
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Founded by leader Yuliia Sachuk, Fight for Right is dedicated to defending “the rights of people with disabilities in Ukraine.” As Russia continues invading Ukraine, this organization is ensuring that those with disabilities are included in humanitarian efforts through coordinating accessible shelters and emergency services. To donate directly to their GoFundMe page, you can click here.

Doctors Without Borders

As an international organization, Doctors Without Borders (MSF) is committed to “providing medical humanitarian assistance to people affected by the war no matter who they are or where they are.” Amid Russia’s continued invasion of Ukraine, MSF is “providing surgical care, emergency medicine, and mental health support” for Ukrainians fleeing war and violence. To donate, you can click here.

Vet Crew

As millions of Ukrainians have left their homes to flee violence or defend their country from Russia’s invasion, many more animals have been left behind. Located in Odessa, Ukraine, Vet Crew is dedicated to helping animals affected by war through providing food, shelter, veterinary care, and more. To support their mission, you can donate here.

United Help Ukraine

United Help Ukraine is a volunteer-based organization committed to supporting Ukrainian citizens and refugees by distributing medical supplies, humanitarian aide, and more to those in need. To donate to support their work, you can click here.

The Kyiv Independent

Founded by 30 journalists and editors who were fired by the Kyiv Post’s owner for defending editorial independence, the Kyiv Independent is one of Ukraine’s leading English-language news publications. Their small team has been working day and night to keep the world updated on the latest news from the ground, and it’s critical for them to continue operating during this crisis. To support their work, you can donate here.

Voices of Children
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As a charitable foundation, Voices of Children is dedicated to helping children overcome the mental and emotional consequences of armed conflict. Their goal is to “give psychological and psychosocial support to children who suffered as a result of war operations.” To support their work in Ukraine, you can donate here.

Help Ukrainian Refugees Make A New Start

Supported by the Women’s Federation For World Peace International, this fundraiser aims to help eastern Ukrainian families adapt to a normal life after being displaced by war. To support this project, you can donate here.

UNICEF for Ukraine

Supported by the United Nations agency, United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) is responsible for providing humanitarian and developmental aid to children in need all over the world. Amid Russia’s military invasion within Ukraine, UNICEF is helping thousands of Ukrainian children fleeing war and violence by providing them with food, shelter, medical care, education, and more. To support this organization’s work, you can donate here.

Nova Ukraine

Founded in 2013, Nova Ukraine is dedicated to providing “humanitarian aid to vulnerable groups and individuals in Ukraine,” as well as raising “awareness about Ukraine in the United States and throughout the world.” To support this organization’s work, you can donate here.

World Central Kitchen

Founded by chef José Andrés, World Central Kitchen (WCK) is dedicated to “providing meals in response to humanitarian, climate, and community crises.” Amid Russia’s continued march into Ukraine, WCK is feeding and coming to the aid of thousands of Ukrainian families fleeing war. To support their mission to feed those in need, you can donate here.

United Nations Crisis Relief

Run by the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), United Nations (UN) Crisis Relief is dedicated to providing “immediate rapid-response aid when disasters strike.” As Russia continues to direct military troops into Ukraine, UN Crisis relief has been food, shelter, education, and more to Ukrainian families fleeing war. To donate and support their work, you can donate to their Ukraine Humanitarian Fund here.

The International Fund for Animal Welfare

If your heart is calling you to help the thousands of fur babies in Ukraine as Russia continues its military invasion, you can donate to the International Fund for Animal Welfare. As the “largest animal welfare and conservation charities in the world,” they work to “rescue individual animals, safeguard populations, preserve habitat, and advocate for greater protections.”

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