5 Ways Traveling All Over The World Has Become So Much Less Intimidating


All the unknowns and "what-ifs" of traveling across the world used to be some of the main reasons why people chose to stay safely confined to their comfort zones, never straying from the familiar.

It was the fear of not being in control that kept us standing still, settling for what we knew.

Luckily, this just isn’t the case anymore. With new-age technology spreading worldwide, it’s never been easier to pick up and explore the world.

Gone are all the anxieties of ending up lost or disconnected.

No more are the terrors of the unknown enough to hold us down. Thanks to the Internet, nothing is unknown anymore. Everything is easily navigated and figured out.

There’s no reason to be afraid because every fear we’ve ever had has already been beautifully accounted for; every detail already worked through.

Traveling has never been less daunting. Throwing yourself into a new culture now seems much less reckless and instead, much more exciting.

There has never been a better time in history to explore the infectious wanderlust in your heart.

Here are five reasons why travel has become so much less scary over time:

1. You don’t have to worry about leaving unfinished business behind.

There are so many hang-ups in everyday life to stop you from dropping everything, buying a plane ticket and just going.

You have a whole host of worries and responsibilities to deal with before you board a plane to anywhere.

What if you can’t pay rent? If you travel, you'll waste all your money on your phone plan and Internet bill.

T-Mobile’s Data Stash, however, makes getting up and going -- even on a whim -- possible.

You don’t have to worry about the data you bought last month because if you decide to take off and see the world, all your unused monthly data rolls over into the next month, waiting for you to take advantage of it.

It’s these kinds of conveniences that make life so much easier and offer quite the incentive to indulge in a life-changing adventure.

2. You don’t need to exchange your dollars for other currencies ahead of time.

Gone are the days of confusing exchange rates and loose Pounds or Euros. With convenient ATM and debit cards, you can go all around the world.

Just enter your information into an ATM and you're armed and ready with whatever currency you'll need.

Sure, the Pound is different than the dollar, and the Euro is different than the Yen, and the Peso is different from the Thai Baht, but you’re going to be far too busy making memories to worry about all that math.

3. You can stay connected to your support group.

One of the scariest parts of being out in unchartered territory is the prospect of losing connection with the people you love back home.

You don’t want to be some stranger in a strange land and find yourself in an emergency without any way of letting your family know.

With Simple Global, you'll have text and data available to connect with your safety net in 120 countries.

Your phone automatically connects to Wi-Fi networks, which means you'll always be within reach of the much-needed contact with loved ones back home.

All the anxieties of be being disconnected will finally dissipate.

4. You can never really get lost.

No one wants to find themselves stranded, lost and alone. The fear of getting lost is enough to make any of us shy away from new experiences.

Luckily, our phones have the power of GPS. Never again will you find yourself with a confusing paper map that doesn’t make any sense.

Now your mobile device will literally walk you to your destination.

5. Everyone is born with a little wanderlust within them. We just have to use it.

The thing about this generation is we’ve all been hopelessly plagued with wanderlust fever.

So, wherever your travels take you, know you can always find a friend.

Whether you find friends standing outside of the Coliseum or whether they're hanging out in your nightly hostel, rest assured knowing you’ll be surrounded by like-minded people who'll help a fellow traveler in need of a little guidance.