How Being Alone Served As A Unique Therapy For My Depression

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We live in a world of constant interactions, whether it's in person or online.

We have the ability to communicate with people all over the world at the press of a button. And it seems we're constantly striving for more "likes" on a photo and more comments on our political posts.

With so much reliance on interactions with other people, where has the appreciation of being alone gone?

Sometimes, we avoid going out alone in fear being judged or looking lonely. Our perception of ourselves is impacted tremendously by others' perceptions of us.

Don't wait for a companion. Get out there and discover the world for yourself.

Doing things alone can feel so invigorating. It gives us the opportunity to focus on our thoughts and feelings. When you do things alone, you become a stronger person because you rely less on other people for your own happiness.

Has there been a movie you've been dying to see? Or is there a new coffee shop down the street you've been wanting to check out?

Don't wait for a companion. Discover the world for yourself.

A few years ago, my brother passed away, and no matter how many people reached out and sent me their condolences, I'd never felt more alone. I felt lost and out of touch with myself.

Before I let my depression wash over me, I realized it was time to start taking care of me.

I needed to reevaluate everything I'd ever believed growing up. My brother's death was a way for me to look at my own perspective on the world I was living in.

And deciding to be on my own was the best decision I'd ever made.

I'd never felt more at peace with myself than I did over the next few years. I began doing things that made me happy because I needed it, rather than waiting to do it with somebody else.

Taking a drive to the beach alone to watch the sunset stopped seeming so scary. I saw movies alone. I went to art shows alone. It was strangely soothing and exhilarating.

I learned more about who I was as a person when I was alone.

I learned more about who I was as a person when I was alone —more than I had in my past 19 years on this earth.

If you're like me, you'll find you're much more open-minded and willing to look at the world differently when you're by yourself.

On the weekends, I'm constantly looking for new art shows to go to, new movies to see and new restaurants to have lunch at. There are a lot of people I could call up to join me, but sometimes, I just need that alone time.

Being on my own allows me to guide my own view of the world. I have no fear of voicing an opinion, offending someone or having a disagreement. The only opinion that matters is my own.

I'm sure you've heard the saying, "You can't be happy with someone until you can be happy on your own." And while I agree with this 100 percent, why should being happy on our own be the building blocks for being happy with someone else?

Just be happy on your own. Don't use it as a crutch to make yourself ready for a relationship.

When I do things on my own, I'm not hoping to meet someone or make myself look strong. I'm doing it because it's truly what I want and need to be doing at that time.

Just be happy on your own. Don't use it as a crutch to make yourself ready for a relationship.

Lose the fear of being judged by others and stop caring what people think.

If someone thinks you look lonely, they'll come talk to you, if anything, and you'll make a new friend. If they think you look pathetic, who cares? You're never going to see them again.

Doing things for yourself is a key component to being truly happy in life. It doesn't make you a "loner," and it doesn't mean you have no friends. It means you put yourself first. You care about yourself and your own mental health.

Collect your own thoughts. Form your own opinions. Discover your own likes and dislikes.

Being alive is a blessing. Cherish it and take advantage of every breath you take — don't wait for someone else to do it with.