Simone Becchetti

Even Asexual People Have Sexual Fantasies, Science Says

There's a lot to learn about those who identify as asexual.

To me, and probably many others, asexuality has been a term to identify those who are essentially celibate with no interest in anything related to sex.

So, I've nonchalantly thrown around the term to describe me going through a dry spell or a friend who's not contributing to our convo about sex.

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Turns out though, that ain't right.

While asexuals don't, in fact, experience sexual attraction when it comes to either gender, a new study found there's still some hint of a freaky side buried deep down within them.

50 percent of asexual women and three quarters of asexual men still have sexual fantasies that populate their thoughts and dreams.

And masturbation? It's most definitely still on the table for asexuals.

"An asexual individual may not experience sexual attraction, but may nonetheless engage in sexual fantasy, perhaps to facilitate physiological sexual arousal and masturbation," the researchers explain.

Well, it seems like asexuals are more like the everyday horny individual than we might have thought!

Not only do they enjoy getting themselves off like the rest of us, but their innate sexual desires, — like getting whipped or seeing someone else get whipped — are not far off from typical fantasies.

The only difference between asexual and sexual people? Asexuals don't have the desire to actually act out these fantasies with someone else.

So, while they may fantasize just as much as sexual people about BDSM and specific fetishes, they are simply not present within these fantasies, nor do they want to actually DO them IRL.

As the researchers say,

When using an open-ended format, asexual participants were more likely to report having fantasies about sexual activities that did not involve themselves, and were less likely to fantasize about topics such as group sex, public sex, and having an affair.
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These findings bring up some interesting questions. Like, if you fantasize about something, does that really mean you actually want to do it?

If not, is it because you're just not comfortable with it, or would you just prefer to see it done and not contribute in any way?

For me (a sexual person), most of my sexual fantasies have developed after hearing or reading about something. And while I don't plan on fulfilling every single sex-driven thought in my head, I've made a conscious effort to broaden my horizons when it comes to trying new things. And a lot of that IS inspired by my fantasies.

In any case, what this new study proves is that asexuals are a lot more multifaceted than we've given them credit for in the past.

So, going forward, you may not want to throw the term around so nonchalantly — an asexuals sexuality is just as mysterious, nuanced and complicated as yours.

Citations: Asexuals Enjoy Masturbation And Fantasies, Despite Having No Sexual Attraction, Study Reveals (Medical Daily), What Asexual People Really Fantasize About (Cosmopolitan)